Posts Tagged ‘winter’

Snowflakes!

January 23rd, 2015

If you have read any of my winter time posts, then you know by now that winter is my FAVORITE season!!! Yup, I’m one of the few weirdos who lives in Minnesota because I love cold and snow. This was the first year that I tried to capture some snowflake pictures. The adventure started out, […]

 

minnesota snowflake 1If you have read any of my winter time posts, then you know by now that winter is my FAVORITE season!!! Yup, I’m one of the few weirdos who lives in Minnesota because I love cold and snow. This was the first year that I tried to capture some snowflake pictures. The adventure started out, like many do, due to a very snow snowy day spent working retail. When you just happen to spend some of your week at a store that specializes in camera gear, there is no reason one should ever get bored! So, my coworker friend and I ran out side and ran around the parking lot like idiots, trying to catch perfect snowflakes. We got a few pictures snapped before the storm kicked into high gear.

GEAR:

Canon 5D Mark III
Tamron 90mm F2.8 VC Macro- I don’t own this one, but I wanted to take it for a test drive, I have the Canon equivalent

SETTINGS:
F 2.8
1/800 Second
ISO 1600

Here are a few tips I discovered while photographing snowflakes. First, catch them on a dark background so that they really stand out. I chose to use my black gloves because that is what I had at the time. As you can see, there is a lot of detail in the woven gloves. In the future, I think I’d use black fabric instead because the knitting is a little too distracting for my taste. Trying to capture them on low branches and brush would be cool as well. Next, if you are going to hold the snowflakes in one hand and the camera in the other, make sure that your shutter speed is set high enough. I wouldn’t go below 1/500, personally. Lastly, I think that in this case, using the manual mode on the camera is going to give you the best possible outcome. The camera is going to go crazy trying to expose for black and translucent with a white sky. Once you have a good exposure, you will be set for the rest of your pictures. One more thing, if you can stop your lens down more than I did, do it (it was pretty dark out when I took these). I had to toss a lot of photos because when the depth of field is that shallow, even breathing is enough to move the cameras locked-in focus- out. Happy shooting!

minnesota snowflake 2 minnesota snowflake 3If you have any other tips, please share in the comments. I LOVE learning and trying new things!